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Classic Featured Artist

MISS LORETTA LYNN

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The name Loretta Lynn is almost as big as country music itself. You can bet that everybody who knows country music knows Loretta Lynn and a lot of people who don't know anything else about country music sure know the name Loretta Lynn. Who can forget the story of her dirt-poor childhood in the coal mining area of Van Lear, Kentucky. How she was named for the movie star Loretta Young, didn't walk until she was four, and almost died three times. Her best-selling autobiography, Coal Miner's Daughter and the 1980 movie that won an Oscar for actress Sissy Spacek made Loretta Lynn a household word and one of the most recognized names in the entertainment world. She quit school after the eighth grade and married O.V. "Mooney" Lynn when she was only 13-years old. It was love at first sight when Loretta saw her "Doolittle" or "Doo" as she called him. He bought her homemade pie at a school social and weeks later on January 10, 1948 they were married and moved to West Virginia where Loretta became a busy housewife and mother. She sang for her babies and her husband. Doo liked her singing and got her a job with a local band on Saturday nights and entered her in a talent contest hosted by Buck Owens. This lead to a spot on Buck's local TV show. The owner of Zero Records saw her and had her record one of her songs "Honky Tonk Girl." Thanks to the efforts of Loretta and Mooney who drove from radio station to radio station getting DJs to play it - the song went to No. 14 and they moved to Nashville. The Wilburn Brothers took notice and got her a guest spot on the Grand Ole Opry in October 1960. She was introduced to the audience by Ernest Tubb. She signed with Decca Records, working with Owen Bradley who was Patsy Cline's producer, and her first Decca single "Success" went to No. 6. In the next decade she ruled the charts with 59 hits as a solo artist - 22 of them in the Top 10 - and 18 more with duet partners Ernest Tubb and Conway Twitty. Her major hits include "You Ain't Woman Enough," "Coal Miner's Daughter," "The Pill," "Don't Come Home A Drinkin,' "One's On the Way," "Love Is The Foundation," "Blue Kentucky Girl" and "Out of My Head and Back In My Bed." She became the first female to win the Country Music Association's Entertainer of the Year (1972). Loretta also won dozens of other major awards including Female Vocalist of the Year and the Academy of Country Music's 1975 Entertainer of the Year. She and Conway were repeatedly the Duo of the Year and she received a 1971 Grammy for "After the Fire Is Gone." She has received the Lifetime Achievement award from ACM and Music City News and in 1985, in Los Angeles, she received the American Music Award of Merit in recognition of her exemplary career in music - a career that was bigger than country - for the power and inspiration of her own distinctive music. Loretta is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame. She is still one of the biggest names in the business and is often a guest on television talk shows, commercials, and in concert venues. Since Mooney's death she has continued to live in their Hurricane Mills, Tennessee home and tourist attraction which she and Doo purchased in 1966. You Ain't Woman Enough Coal Miner's Daughter The Pill Don't Come A Drinkin' (With Lovin' On Your Mind) One's On The Way Love Is The Foundation Blue Kentucky Girl Out Of My Head And Back In My Bed Academy of Country Music Album of the Year 1975 Academy of Country Music Entertainer of the Year 1975 Academy of Country Music Top Female Vocalist 1975 Academy of Country Music Top Vocal Duet 1975 American Music Awards Favorite Country Band Duo or Group 1975 CMA Vocal Duo of the Year 1975 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1975 Music City News Country Vocal Duet of the Year 1975 Academy of Country Music Top Female Vocalist 1974, Academy of Country Music Top Vocal Duet 1974 CMA Vocal Duo of the Year 1974 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1974 Music City News Country Vocal Duet of the Year 1974 Academy of Country Music Top Female Vocalist 1973 CMA Female Vocalist of the Year 1973 CMA Vocal Duo of the Year 1973 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1973 Music City News Country Vocal Duet of the Year 1973 CMA Entertainer of the Year 1972 CMA Female Vocalist of the Year 1972 CMA Vocal Duo of the Year 1972 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1972 Music City News Country Vocal Duet of the Year 1972 Academy of Country Music Top Female Vocalist 1971 Academy of Country Music Top Vocal Duet 1971 Grammy Best Country Performance by Duo/Group W/Vocals 1971 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1971 Music City News Country Vocal Duet of the Year 1971 Academy of Country Music Artist of the Decade 1970-1979 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1970 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1969 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1968 CMA Female Vocalist of the Year 1967 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1967 Music City News Living Legend 1986 Music City News Country Vocal Duet of the Year 1981 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1980 Music City News Vocal Duet of the Year 1980 American Music Awards Favorite Country Band Duo or Group 1978 American Music Awards Favorite Female Artist 1978 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1978 Music City News Country Vocal Duet of the Year 1978 American Music Awards Favorite Country Band, Duo or Group 1977 American Music Awards Favorite Female Artist 1977 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1977 Music City News Country Vocal Duet of the Year 1977 Academy of Country Music Top Vocal Duet 1976 Music City News Country Album of the Year 1976 Music City News Country Female Artist of the Year 1976 Music City News Country Vocal Duet of the Year 1976

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Mr.Anderson

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Bill Anderson
AKA Whispering Bill
Born Nov 1, 1937 in Columbia, SC
Years Active
Genres Country
Styles Nashville Sound/Countrypolitan, Country-Pop, Traditional Country
Instruments Vocals, Songwriter
Tones Gentle, Calm/Peaceful, Laid-Back/Mellow, Melancholy
Labels Decca (13), Varese (3), Curb (2), Capitol (2)


Singer Bill Anderson was one of the most enduring and talented songwriters in country music. Born in South Carolina and raised in Georgia he began writing songs professionally while working as a disc jockey in Commerce, GA. He wrote "City Lights" in 1958, and it became a major hit for Ray Price. Later that year he had his own success with his debut single, "That's What It's Like to Be Lonesome."
Anderson came into his own during the 1960s when he had 24 hit songs on the national charts; among them was "Tips of My Fingers" (1960) and "Po Folks" (1961). He joined the Grand Ole Opry in 1961. He had his first number one country hit in 1962 with "Mama Sang a Song,". The next year he had a cross-over hit with "Still," which reached number one on the country charts and made it to the Top Ten on the pop charts. During the '60s, Anderson also hosted a syndicated music show.

During the 1970s, Anderson continued to find success with such hits as "Love Is a Sometimes Thing" (1970) and the number one "World of Make Believe" (1973). He also cut a series of popular duets that included the smash "For Loving You" with Jan Howard in 1967. He also became a successful television producer and hosted ABC's game show The Better Sex; he later appeared regularly on that network's soap opera One Life to Live. Throughout his long career, Anderson won scores of awards including 50 songwriting awards from BMI. In a Billboard magazine poll he was named one of the "Three Greatest Country Music Songwriters" and in 1975 was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. In addition to releasing new material throughout the 90's, Anderson continued to appear regularly on the Grand Ole Opry and tour with his band Po Folks. Sandra Brennan



Similar Artists: George Morgan
Roots and Influences: Hank Williams Roy Acuff
Followers: Atlanta
Performed Songs By: Steve Karliski Jimmy Gateley Steve Wariner Jerry Todd Danny Dill Gary Nicholson T. Texas Tyler Mel Tillis Orville Couch Mike Settle Buddy Killen Felice Bryant Curtis Leach Billy Gray Jan Howard
Worked With: Meat Purveyors Bigfoot Chester Cherilyn DiMond Walter Daniels Jimmy Corn Darcie Deaville Poison 13 Mike Johnson Weird Al Yankovic Jimmy Sturr Hillbilly Holiday Davy Jones Al Anderson Rance Allen George Jones Michael Johnson David Allan Coe




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